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Exhibition

This is tomorrow Part II

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About

Key takeaways

1. As was for the first part of the exhibition, the second part of 'This is tomorrow' is also shown both on and offline, examining how the physicality of the exhibition fills the existing space and its recognized online

2. With two Korean artists, Rahm Parc and Nalsea, the exhibition poses the question around the concept of ‘presence’ and how it is interpreted online when the viewers are only left with the visual perception and hearing without the physical space

Date

Aug 31 - Sep 25, 2021

Venue

Space Can / Old House

Space Can / Old House

Seoul

info@can-foundation.org

Technology makes it possible to capture from microscopic elements that cannot be distinguished by the naked eye to a vast universe, on a single screen. The online space makes us question ‘where exactly we are’ due to the ambiguity of physical borders and existing concept of time. While the first part of This is tomorrow talked about the sensory responses of the changing environment, the second part of the exhibition talks about the 'perception' of time and space that is both expanding and shrinking.

Through her work, Rahm Parc conveys the changed sense of time and space in the present moment, where the boundaries of on and offline have been blurred. Parc places ‘invisible colors that aimlessly float in the space of time and memories’ on the walls of Old House. These colors exist but cannot be seen, like air or viruses. The Index Series from the solo exhibition Times (2020) have been floating behind an invisible space and travelled through another solo exhibition Blue, Blue (2021) to arrive at Old House in a different form of blue. Breaking away from the framework of traditional paintings such as duplication or reproduction of objects, Parc creates colors with a new meaning based on the time of the particular space. If the aura of Parc’s mural stems from the two conditions ‘now and here’, the work is shown along a line that is bound to break in the space and will only remain as a trace in a recording after the exhibition.

Nalsea discovers the future from the past memories, and reminisces the past from the present. The artist imagines the future from nature where the past has been preserved; Bamseom that floats among the concrete jungle of Seoul, and Svanholm in Denmark. From these real-life experiences, although these may have come from the artist’s aspirations, he thought of the Saemangeum reclamation project. Sounds were collected from the embankment of Saemangeum, Haechang mudflat, and Surat mudflat, then other sounds were added. The harmony of these different sounds are the artist’s interpretation of the future of the locations, and the exhibition space, where the act of listening is taking place becomes a space for reminiscing the past. The artist makes it difficult to distinguish between collected sound and the artificial sound, adding the dreamy rhythmic element while the listener travels to the future.

As was for the first part of the exhibition, the second part of This is tomorrow is also shown both on and offline, examining how the physicality of the exhibition fills the existing space and its recognized online. The exhibition also poses the question around the concept of ‘presence’ and how it is interpreted online when the viewers are only left with the visual perception and hearing without the physical space.