/page_background.webp

Explore Eazel

Art World

Editorial

Become a Member

Exhibition

Parallels & Peripheries: Practice + Presence

webvr cover

About

Key takeaways

1. An exhibition showcasing work created by primarily BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) artists associated with the New York Academy of Art, including visiting critics, alumni of the Academy’s MFA program, full time and adjunct faculty, visiting speakers, and currently enrolled students

2. The exhibition explores and interrogates representation, identity, and the place of an artist in depicting themselves and others; an especially important discourse given the Academy’s role as a national center for contemporary figurative art and portraiture

Date

Feb 10 - Mar 7, 2021

Venue

New York Academy of Art

New York Academy of Art

New York

exhibitions@nyaa.edu

Curator

Larry Ossei-Mensah

Robyn Gibson

Artists

Brittany A. Fields

Olúwatósìn Adésànyà-Ọlálé̩yẹ

Jessica Alazraki

Eddie Arroyo

James Xavier Barbour

Carlos Bautista

Dayana Beisenova

Alicia Brown

Leeanna Chipana

David Antonio Cruz

Philadelphia

Jaki Doyka

Riham ElSadany

Julio Stanly Flores

Santiago Galeas

Robyn Gibson

Ramiro Gomez

Andrae Green

David R. Ibata

Monica Ikegwu

Baltimore

Steven Anthony Johnson II

Rex Kare II

Dik F. Liu

Helena La Rota López

Alvaro Luna

Beverly McIver

Greensboro, NC

Ariel Cabrera Montejo

Rebecca Montes

Prinston Nnanna

Brooklyn

Nelson Nuñez

Guno Park

Eliana Perez

Lauren Amalia Redding

Hernán J. Rivera

Luis Rodriguez

Audrey Rodriguez

Bahar Sabzevari

Iran

Manu Saluja

Julie Severino

Jean Shin

Darryl Babatunde Smith

Paul Anthony Smith

Eric Telfort

Phillip Thomas

Telvin Wallace

Jingyi Wang

Tabitha Whitley

Jiannan Wu

Jim Xu

The New York Academy of Art presents Parallels & Peripheries: Practice + Presence, an exhibition showcasing work created by primarily BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) artists affiliated with the Academy. The in-person show is available to view by appointment and will be accompanied by a virtual exhibition via Eazel and a digital catalog featuring essays by the curators.

Parallels and Peripheries presents work by over 40 artists associated with the New York Academy of Art, including Visiting Critics, alumni of the Academy’s MFA program, full time and adjunct faculty, Visiting Speakers, and currently enrolled students. As with all Academy exhibition, the interaction of works by high-profile contemporary artists such as Eddie Arroyo, Jean Shin, Paul Anthony Smith and Beverly McIver with emerging artists and art students just embarking on their careers provides a forum for a rich and robust dialogue.

The exhibition explores and interrogates representation, identity, and the place of an artist in depicting themselves and others; an especially important discourse given the Academy’s role as a national center for contemporary figurative art and portraiture. The exhibition provides a platform to further explore narratives, ideas and concerns of artists whose voices have not been centered within the traditional art historical canon. The works in the show grapple with a variety of subject matter that centers the viewpoints of BIPOC artists, while holding space for these voices in the halls of the Academy.

Curator Larry Ossei-Mensah notes that “BIPOC artists are cultivating dynamic artistic practices designed to amplify perspectives and points of view that historically have pushed to the margins.” Parallels & Peripheries is the fifth in an exhibition series curated by Ossei-Mensah investigating how contemporary artists create work constructed from narratives, myths, experiences, and memories that shape personal, political, and societal identities.

Robyn Gibson, an alumna of the Academy’s MFA program, and assistant curator for the exhibition, writes of her impetus for the staging of the show: As a Black artist studying at the New York Academy of Art, I often asked myself “Where do I fit?” And more strongly, “Do I even belong here?” Black artists in predominantly white institutions often experience a scarcity of faces like our own. We are also immersed in a history of art that excludes our ancestors from the conversation or curriculum. It can get exhausting, but there comes a time when you have to push back and create space for yourself.

This exhibition insurance is sponsored by AXA XL.
Shipping support is generously provided by Cadogan Tate.