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Exhibition

Randall Mooers

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About

Key takeaways

1. Mooers' photo-realistic still-life paintings are based on his inspiration from the past four centuries of object-specific paintings by such masters as Willem Kalf, Cézanne, and Morandi

2. Mooers seeks out a balanced and harmonious composition by way of line, shape, and color under the Dadaist dictate that "anything can be art"

Date

Feb 11 - Mar 14, 2020

Venue

George Billis Gallery

George Billis Gallery

New York

gallery@georgebillis.com

My paintings begin with a serious sense of play, both in the staging and the creating of the compositions. It is at this beginning stage that I operate under the Dadaist dictate that “anything can be art”, and at the same time I seek out a balanced and harmonious composition by way of line, shape, and color. I work according to my whimsy, sometimes seeking to assert some form of narrative however personal or ambiguous, and other times I am simply satisfied with the hint of a human presence.

Once I have my compositions the paintings then very quickly become about work, a very labor intensive work that forces me to focus my mind and slow things down (which I feel is relevant especially in this day and age of high-speed everything). A great amount of effort is spent on trying to get to the highest level of finish that is possible according to my current skill level.

For inspiration I have drawn from the past four centuries of object specific paintings, from the ontbijtjes (laid tables) of the 17th Century Dutch masters such as Willem Kalf, Jan Davidsz de Heem, Abraham van Beijeren, Peiter Claus Heda and Willem Claesz Heda, to the kitchen settings of Chardon, as well as the still life’s of Cézanne, and the Nature Morte paintings of Morandi, also some of the intensely skillful hyperrealist and trompe l’oeil painters working today.

Randall Mooers